How Gameplay Loops Keep You Playing



Check out Errant Signal: Also I lied the link to my patreon is in the comments, sike! The Architect isn’t the only person out there …

source

Advertisements

You might be interested in

Comment (24)

  1. I'm still trying to put together how to make a gameplay loop or distinguish it as "medium loop," I'm studying to be a game designer and I'm sure what way to build out the core gameplay beyond just making what seems fun. Should I try to make a fun gameplay shtick and then append another one? Any advice would be appreciated

  2. This was a great video & I've subscribed on the strength of it, but I do wish your subtitles were a little better, since I have great difficulty following without subtitles but the subtitles on this were actually more confusing than not having any, unfortunately. (Concrete suggestions: subtitles that actually match what you're saying, rather than what was in the script, and line breaks in "natural" breaks in the flow rather than wherever would help a lot.)

  3. Shorter more enjoyable loops are the reason I have like tens of indie rougelikes (but not only) games in my library and maybe 1 or 2 bigger games. I can't get bothered to try and chip at 40+hour open world game when I can have a satisfying session in 20-30 minutes and decide if I wanna play more or not. Games like Enter the Gungeon, Slay the Spire, Into The Breach, Crypt of Necrodancer, Spelunky, Dead Cells and many more.

  4. 11:15 I had the exact same experience with Skyrim. I got through the entire game without really feeling much more than one or two times, and then later, when I was poking around in my Steam library my eye fell on the playtime of 120 hours and I just felt cheated and pathetic, because it made me think about how I'd felt spending that time and I realized that I'd been having actual fun or actually engaging for maybe five hours of that, and most of that wasn't really things I give the game any credit for, like my amusing thoughts about conquering the entire world.

  5. Out of all games on the mobile, all games that are so LOW EFFORT, HIGH PROFIT, completely lacking art and heart, u chose Clash Royal to be said on the sentence "crappy mobile games".. 🙁 clash royale is one of the only games that are GOOD and have a HEART AND SOUL on it. so many, so many milking-cows-of-cash games out there.. not saying clash ain't about cash also, but i mean COME ON its one of the ONLY games on mobile which are of HIGH QUALITY PRODUCTION AND ART. "crappy mobile games" …

  6. nice video. It really makes you think about the design the core loop and how in some games it can keep players wanting more.

    I am not really convinced about 2 core loops. According to the book "Challenges for game designers" by Brenda Romer we have a single coore loop and we build up on it.
    It seems like you are calling some positive and negative feedback loops as core game loops. Like the mining game you show. It seems like the core loop is simply Mining and gathering loot and the loot space limit is just a negative feedback loop or a drain.

  7. Noita has an interesting gameplay loop.
    You are a mage and you can die VERY fast if you do not pay attention and even if you are, you can just get an unlucky enemy spawn.
    It still works with your skill and rewards you for taking it slow and exploring. But on the same not it also moves you forward to the next section by only having healing between the layers.
    You can go up if you have the neccessary spells and time, but it is always a risk.
    So by having a smaller loop in the different layers and an overarching loop of die and retry it keeps you engaged, but because the overarching loop feels so random at times it can be very frustrating.
    Each time you die you lose everything and start in a completly new seed. Currently only with mods or file manipulation are you able too keep the seed after you die.

  8. Game loops are not a very useful lens to look at game design. Obviously it's very hard to design a separate unique gameplay mechanic for every section of the game (even though games like that exist), so it's natural that the same mechanic will be used repeatedly. That in itself doesn't tell us much about game design.

    Most of the things you were talking about actually relate more closely to skinner box designs. You can learn more about those here:

  9. I used to have a big problem with not finishing games, so I developed a new policy.
    I play one game at a time and I stick with it until it is finished. If I don't feel like continuing a game, I make a decision regarding whether I want to finish it. If I decide not to finish it, I leave it with no intention of coming back to it. If I decide to finish it then I stick to it before moving on to something else.

  10. Excellent video! Death Stranding suffers heavily from this. The "loop" of making it from one place to the next is so grindy, tedious, and requires so much inventory management by navigating menus. The loop comes sporadically when you see other players liking your structures or using your bridges, etc. An action you took 10 hrs ago now has a payoff. And that weirdly keeps you going with the same actions. But the actual act of traversing the environment in-game from one generic looking city to the next generic looking distribution center just isn't engaging.

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: